Thank You Video to the Medical Teams

I don’t know the origin of  this video, but it appears to be of American origin, based on the dialogue and the apparent native American accent.

Recently I witnessed a commotion in downtown Guiyang where there were a lot of honking horns and police were standing at attention, saluting.  There was a traffic procession. It turns out that the doctors from Guiyang who went to Wuhan to fight the virus were returning home after about one month on duty. They were being given an honorable welcome home from the local people.

Another Update CoronaVirus2019 20200225 by John S. Porter

OK, back in service on the internet. I am quarantined, but allowed out of my house to go get food. I am monitored everywhere I go. Last week, about 10 days ago they gave me a card that had all the dates in the coming 3 months on it. I got a check mark every time I went out and had to wait 2 days before I could go out again. I have my temperature checked every time I go in and out. After four days, the 18th I had to line up to get out of the apartment complex. There maybe four officials checking the individuals in each room of the apartment house. I remember because I missed the bus going to the bank. It took all week to take 700RMB out of the bank, but that’s another story.

The Chinese installed an APP on my cell phone so I simply scan the scan-code and my phone records the time I left. Then when I get on the bus, I hit another scan-code that tells them I got on the bus. The net result is that the germ bags walking around town were all taken off the streets. Everybody wears masks. Streets that were in traffic jams are literally empty. All stores, except essential food stores are closed. It is amazing. It looks like I imagine Chernobyl Russia looked after the nuke event.

The Chinese have done an incredible job getting this situation in hand. More than eleven hundred health care workers have contracted the illness and there are pictures on social medial of a wife kissing their husband goodbye as if he is going to war. A small tear in her eye, but because he is a doctor he must go to Wuhan, the war zone. In the course of a couple weeks I recon, Wuhan has had every house searched, and the occupants tested for the virus. It has been a massive dragnet and cleanup. If anybody asks if all this trouble is necessary, I feel the answer is definitely YES. There have been no new cases (reported) in Guiyang for several days now.

What is insidious about this enemy is that you can be a carrier, or even a supercarrier, without showing symptoms. When somebody gets sick it is necessary to figure out who that person has been in contact with over the last ten days, track them down, and test them. I was in Guiyang 17 years ago when SARS hit. That was an awkward response because the true situation was hidden by government officials for months. Guizhou (my province) was the only province that didn’t get a SARS case. We are kind of isolated and in the mountains. In the end of January, when the first figures were published, we already had ten cases and rising fast. I believe the response was appropriately heavy handed, and seems successful. I am hoping that by two or three weeks into March that we will start to be getting back to work. The economic damage has been massive, like most wars.

I think the risk for me is quite low, but the inconvenience is high. We are all keeping in touch with each other by social media. I did take a long trip yesterday to stock up on coffee beans which are fairly rare in my neighborhood. I felt justified in taking off for a while because the coffee crisis seemed like an emergency to me.

In front of an almost vacant mall, with a METRO store where I bought my coffee, I saw a young couple nose to nose, trying to kiss with their masks on. I didn’t know whether to yell at them to be careful of the virus, or just cry. I walked quickly by to leave them to their privacy, nose to nose beside a vacant six lane street. If it sounds surreal, that’s because it was.

I will leave it at that right now. More will be forthcoming. Get ready, this has potential to be like a 1918 Spanish Flu. China had a head start on fighting this thing because people spreading false information got arrested quickly, and the government already has detailed records on where everybody lives. I worry about my countrymen. Will the People cooperate with their government when draconian government power is asserted during an election and in the summer of the ten-year census?

Will all the undocumented border jumpers come out to be tested in the sanctuary cities? Don’t cancel your cable TV just yet. There’s going to be a lot of entertainment this year for all you news freaks. Stock your pantries and pick out a nice surgical mask. This is a not so slow-moving train coming right at the human race. I hope I am exaggerating. Let’s just work together and try to get through this. Pray for good luck, good leaders, and an understanding country.

Check these out:

How a Virus Can Spread

Flights from China are again landing at Detroit Metro Airport.

Detroit Metro Airport Selected To Accept Flights From China

WWJ NEWS

FEBRUARY 04, 2020 – 7:43 AM
airport coronavirus
(Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
CATEGORIES:

DETROIT (WWJ) – Flights from China are again landing at Detroit Metro Airport.

The Department of Homeland Security says Detroit Metro is one of 11 airports in the U.S. to start receiving flights from China amid the ongoing coronavirus outbreak.

The department on Sunday began enforcing restrictions for all passenger flights to the U.S. carrying individuals who have recently traveled from China.

Under the new rules, U.S. citizens who have traveled in China within the last 14 days will be re-routed to one of 11 designated airports, where they will undergo enhanced health screening procedures. Those returning from Hubei province, the center of the outbreak, will be subject to up to 14 days of mandatory quarantine.

“Although airport staff does not conduct passenger screening, our emergency responders are prepared to support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and local health departments with medical transportation and police escorts, when needed,” Wayne County Airport Authority CEO Chad Newton said in a statement. “Also, out of an abundance of caution, we’re cleaning the Federal Inspection Station—also known as the International Arrivals area—more frequently in both the McNamara and North terminals.”

Meanwhile, most non-U.S. citizens who have traveled in China within the last 14 days will be denied entry into the United States, except for immediate family members of U.S. citizens, permanent residents and flight crew.

The virus has infected almost 10,000 people globally in just two months, a troublesome sign that prompted the World Health Organization to declare the outbreak a global emergency. Although the CDC expects more cases of the coronavirus in the U.S., the risk of infection for Americans remains low.

For more information on travel to and from China, visit the DHS website.

Incredible Toe Job

It looks uglier than it turned out to be.

I waited too long again with this ingrown toenail. I have a lady that gives foot massages and she is also a significantly skilled doctor.  She did the “surgery”, taking out half of my toenail, leaving only the hole in the side of my toe.  I don’t know what it would have cost in the USA. There was no anesthetic. She was so skilled with her sharp knife that the pain was quite bearable.

The sixty RMB bill iwas less than nine USD. The treatment included the other nine toes, sulfa, a bandaid, and a final dressing. It is good as new, with only a hole. Some things are still a bargain in China. (Photos taken with my Huawei 10+ cell phone and it’s Leika camera).

Long Li Ancient City and Jin Ping Countryside

Long Li is located about four hours southeast of Guiyang in an area of Miao and Dong minority people. The walls around the city, the water system and the fortress are all intact.  It doesn’t have the tourist pressure like some old cities closer to Guiyang. It is surrounded by the beautiful countryside of Jinping County.

San Cha You Farming

Jinping County has a new product called San Cha You, which is a cooking oil. The mountains of Jinping County are covered with these oil bearing plants. It is an incredibly beautiful sight. You can also directly drink the oil.  It is still expensive, but has been shown to be very good for high blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar diabetes conditions. It has also been shown to raise immunity to some cancers.San Cha berry trees are in great supply. The locals have actively planted and cultivated these crops for many years.

There is a new factory under construction and it is hoped that as production increases, that the price will come down and the product will be more widely known and distributed.

Jin Ping County is also famous for blueberries. There are blueberry farms in many places with very attractive prices in season, around August of each year.

 

 

 

Bangkok Chiangmai Hospital and My Bad Back

Jumping right to the conclusion: whether you go in for a bad back or anything else, review your medical bills carefully before paying and make sure you ask for what you want from the moment you set the appointment . . .

I spent a $100 or so more than expected to address my bad back. The customer service and administration reviewed my complaints and eventually satisfied me. I finally got the exercise tips I went in for, but a lesson was learned.

I followed up my blood pressure issue in Chiangmai this trip (Jan 1- Jan 8) See: http://www.tourguizhou.com/bangkok-chiangmai-heart-center/. Since Thailand is known for it’s massages, I figured the Bankok Hospital therapists might know the best excercises to help my low back. I’ve had this condition (alignment problem in low back) for a good 35 or 40 years. Since Thailand is noted for both massages and kick boxing, this seemed like the place to go. I like massages and probably hurt myself with my Taikwondo kicks when I was young.

Unfortunately time was short the day I visited. All I wanted was to get some pointers on exercises that I should and shouldn’t do, and perhaps have a physical therapy session showing me the best treatments. The doctor insisted that I get an Xray before giving me advice. This was beyond what I really wanted but he assured me that it would only cost between 25 and 50 USD. He also asked about whether I had a back brace. When I told him no, he said he would give me one.

After the Xray he diagnosed my condition as spondylolithsis, a condition that I had already told him about. Since I was late for my bus back to the Hostel I was quickly given a brace by a tech and I paid my bill. It seemed high, but I didn’t really have time to review it. It was for both the visit to the heart specialist and the back issue.

My back doctor made an appointment for me for the following day to see a “consult specialist”. After reviewing the billing I discovered that the heart specialist and blood pressure medication totalled about $26.80 and the back related expenses totalled $185.47 The back brace that the doctor said he would give me cost $53.57 and the Xray related services, which were quoted to me at between $25 and $50 cost $85.71.

I didn’t appear for the appointment the following day out of fear of further charges. At that point I hadn’t received any physical therapy or advice of significance other than don’t do sit-ups and don’t bend the back.

The doctor seemed pre-programmed: Consult, Xray, Diagnose, sell a back brace, refer to the next doctor. I reviewed the entire event with the hospital administrators and I eventually got the therapy advice I needed. It was complimentary. Also, the Xray and brace were helpful, so I can’t really complain about the value. I simply relearned something I should already know: just because somebody speaks English doesn’t mean they listen to English well, or even that they are listening.

There is another point that came up as I talked to the administration and quality control boss. When coming into the hospital, it is important to be clear on what symptoms you have, how long you have had the symptoms, what prior treatment you have had, and what you want in way of treatment/results. Then, get an estimate of the costs.

The Chinese hospitals I have been to seem to have a good system. They bring you in and you pay a nominal sum to talk to the doctor, and then decide what needs to be done. Then you go to the cashier to pay for the treatments in advance. With paid receipt in hand, you go and get your treatment. That’s a Chinese system.

As a foreigner, if it is convenient, it is probably a good idea to sit down with some translation software and write out your issues and expectations prior to your visit. If not convenient, maybe the intake people can handle enough English to perform this function.

One of the leaders in the hospital spoke really excellent English. It turns out he was in the US military and served both Bush presidents, two campaigns, in Iraq. After retiring from the US military, he worked a few years in a US hospital before returning to his native Thailand. I got really good service from him, not only at the hospital, but he defended my country as well. He even went back to his native land and saved Trump the trouble of deporting him.

I can recommend the Bangkok Chiangmai Hospital for your health care needs. As noted above, you need to be clear from the outset what you expect and need, but the pricing is good and the people are competent and quite nice.

 

Bangkok Chiangmai Heart Center

I’ve had two trips to Chianmai and checked out the medical facilities there. Living in China I decided to have an escape plan if I have some major medical issue and can’t get back to the USA promptly. This visit I checked out the Bankok Chiangmai Heart Cener and its Hospital. I found an extremely modern situation with top doctors.

Medical care is a significant concern in China and Thailand is known for advanced, Western trained doctors and hospitals. One of the top hospitals in Thailand is Bangkok Hospital.  It has a branch in Ghiangmai, relatively close to Guiyang.

I had swelling in my ankles and a couple doctors suggested that this might be related to a heart condition, leaky valves or something is possible. I forgot to mention it to my USA doctor until I was walking out the door this summer and he suggested maybe I should get a blood test to see if this heart condition might be present. Cutting to the conclusion, I am fine and my blood pressure medication has been modified to reduce or eliminate the swelling.

I found the staff to be friendly and efficient. My doctor was the head of the department and gave me a complete examination. He explained everything to me about heart stuff. The reception area was not crowded and very pleasant. I left feeling that I had top service comparing with any in the USA. The price, including ten days medication was $38.02 on my Mastercard. We’ll see if that can be covered by my USA insurance, but I’m not worried about it. The hospital even has a free shuttle from the city center.

 

Wedding of a Dermatologist with a Gynaecologist in Guiyang. Why Doctors only marry Doctors

Syed Saalim Hashmi and Nargis with renowned Dermatologist from Guizhou People’s hospital Dr. Jeremiah and Dr. Lu Joao, a senior IVF expert from Department of Obs & Gynae during their wedding reception. 

Fifty years ago, it was very uncommon to find doctors married to other doctors. Why? To answer that question, we need to explore the sociology of the time. Fewer women went to college, which meant fewer female doctors. Many couples married early, right out of high school or right after college. If the wife had career aspirations herself, these were often put aside in order to help her husband get through medical school.

 

Today, men and women often delay marriage until their late twenties or early thirties for a variety of reasons. For many, they want to achieve career success before adding the demands of family. Others simply don’t feel ready to settle down at 22 years old, the way their parents did.

Given the rigor and all-consuming nature of medical school and residency, this is particularly true for doctors. As many more young doctors enter the final stages of their training still single, there is more opportunity to find the perfect mate among their colleagues.

When doctors marry doctors

The epitome of office romance, flirtation between young residents or between nurses and doctors may seem like something straight out of an ER or Greys Anatomy script. But who would better understand the stress young residents face than another resident (or nurse)?

Think about who you spend most of your time with and the social circles you find yourself in. Likely, you are mostly surrounded by other doctors and health professionals by necessity; there is not much time for outside pursuits, right? When young doctors spend 60 to 80 hours per week at the hospital, and the rest of their free time studying, the bonds that form among fellow residents and hospital staff become very important.

 

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, around 47 percent of medical school graduates in the United States are female, and in some states, that percentage creeps even closer to 50 percent. It is very likely for doctors to be attracted to and pursue a relationship with someone they spend a lot of time with. AMA Insurance reports in the 2014 Work/Life Profiles of Today’s U.S. Physician that 40 percent of doctors marry other doctors or health care professionals.

The benefits

There are several obvious benefits to the formation of romantic attachments between doctors and their peers or colleagues. Probably the most obvious is that another doctor or health professional knows what you are going through. They understand the stress, the guilt, the sleep deprivation, the grief, the fear. They also understand the passion for healing and the desire to care for others, and that the duty and responsibility often comes before self or the relationship.

While this is not to say that someone outside the health profession can’t be supportive (remember, over 50 percent of doctors also marry outside the field, with often successful results), it can be very affirming to know you can cut loose without fear of being misunderstood.

Communication between health professionals is often easier. The medical shorthand and complex jargon is sometimes difficult for people outside the health fields to understand. Since doctors live and breathe medicine 16 hours/day, it can be difficult to turn that off when you come home and frustrating to constantly explain terminology.

On the other side of the examination table, it may also be difficult for a doctor or health professional to relate to career challenges and office politics a spouse may face in non-health-related careers, which can be frustrating for the spouse. For this reason, shared experiences, common language, and similar priorities of couples who both practice in the medical profession can be beneficial in developing strong marriages.

The challenges

While there are many benefits to choosing a partner from within the healthcare profession, there are certainly challenges. The practice of medicine tends to attract certain strong personality types. Medical schools train doctors to be decision makers, often in life-or-death situations. It’s very difficult to turn off that intellectual authoritarian persona when you arrive home. If you are also married to a doctor, then inevitable clash of who gets to be the decision maker could be epic. While marrying another doctor may benefit you in terms of easier communication and shared experience, you may both need to work hard to cultivate a different set of skills at home: compromise and humility.

But what if your spouse or partner is not a doctor but another member of the health care profession (nurse, physical therapist, administrator, etc.)? Doctors and nurses (and other health care professionals) may share common experiences and communicate on a similar level, but they view their roles and contributions through different lenses. Neither is right or wrong, just different. Being able to view the world through your partner’s lens may not only help you be a better spouse, but may also give you insights that will help you be a better doctor. While extremely worthwhile, this task isn’t easy.

Other challenges that may face couples in the health care professions revolve around work-life balance. This is true for many people in demanding careers, but few careers are as all-consuming as health care. It’s not only the work hours, but health care providers pour so much of themselves into their work — their passion, their devotion, even their emotions — that there is often little left at the end of the day for outside pursuits and for putting effort into relationships. If both partners are consumed in this way, it makes relationships all the more challenging.

Exacerbating the emotional challenges are the logistical ones: competing work schedules, reliable child care, etc. Some couples even find it difficult to schedule time off or vacation time together, especially if they work in the same hospital.

A growing trend

Statistics seem to indicate that the trend of doctors choosing lifemates from within the medical community will continue to grow. Like any relationship, these marriages can be happy and fulfilling with a little work and effort. These marriages don’t require more effort than the typical marriage, but doctors typically have much less left to give at the end of the day. To make marriages between health professionals work, understanding the challenges you will face and developing coping mechanisms early in your relationship will be helpful